Why would you buy a costly platform bed from Ikea or somewhere else when you can make one yourself at home? Oh yes, you can. A bed is the most common furniture piece used in the house and probably the costliest one. Wouldn’t it be great if you could just make a bed of your own, without having to spend many bucks for buying one? So I am here sharing a great tutorial to help you to build a nice comfy platform bed that you can use anywhere in the house.
If you tend to love woodworking projects, this workbench is certainly something that you should build. You can get all of the supplies you need to make it for around $20, which is much cheaper than buying an already made workbench. It’s cheap and nothing that you would expect to see in a high end workshop, but it’s also sturdy and definitely gets the job done. 

It might not be the easiest project in this list, but if you already have some experience with wood cutting and joinery, it won’t be any hassle at all. Thanks to the extremely detailed instructions it shouldn’t really be a problem even if you’re not very familiar with woodworking. This could actually be a great project for refining your woodworking skills as a beginner!

With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
If you want something really unique from those 2X4s, build these hexagon wall planters. You cut strips of the 2X4 (you only need a couple of feet for each planter) and then assemble them to hold a mason jar. Inside the mason jar, you can put all sorts of fresh flowers or plants. These are so creative and will look beautiful hanging inside your home.
If you need a sawhorse for all of those woodworking projects, this is an easy one to build. You just nail your 2X4s together to create it and since those boards are a bit heavy, this little sawhorse is rock solid. You won’t have to worry about your boards slipping when you have them on here for sawing. If you don’t have a sawhorse, and you don’t want to spend upwards of $50 to buy a pair, I strongly recommend this DIY project.
This wall art is amazing and will certainly draw attention from all of your guests. It’s made from 2X4 scraps and is pretty easy to build despite how complicated it looks. The board blocks are toggled to give it dimension and overall, it’s a stunning piece of art that you are sure to love hanging. You could stain or leave the blocks plain or even paint them different colors to add even more dimension.
Before fall comes around, you just have to make this great pumpkin décor from those leftover 2X4 scraps. These look like decorations that you can get at Hobby Lobby and other similar stores, which typically run around $50 for the set. You can make them yourself for under $5 if you have the boards on hand. Just paint them orange and add your decorations. This is such a simple project and it gives you such lovely décor for fall.
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!
We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.

Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.


Many of these DIYs are so easy that you can do them in your spare time. Have a weekend free? You can build an outdoor couch, bench, or any number of console and coffee tables to add farmhouse rustic style to your home. In less than an hour, you can make wonderful holiday décor or some beautiful gifts for teachers and friends. I’m telling you, these projects are all super easy and they’re all so very inexpensive. I love simple and cheap projects, and particularly when those projects end in rustic or farmhouse furnishings. Check out these 55 farmhouse furniture projects that you can make yourself.
I’ve always wanted to make my own barstools. I just can never seem to find the ones that I want, which is why I love this 2X4 project idea. You can make your own set of barstools with just a few boards and then paint or stain them however you need to so that they match your home décor. I love this idea for its uniqueness and for how really simple it is to do.
The shelf in the first picture is made of red oak plywood. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. In case if you need more help understanding this project, you can refer the source link below. It discusses various items used, steps and tips and personal experience of the author who personally built a Zigzag shelf.
Here’s a great project for using up those 2X4s – build yourself a farmhouse kitchen table! I love this entire project. It’s a relatively easy build and I just adore the thought of a huge kitchen table where family and friends can gather. If you’ve ever wanted to bring some serious farmhouse style into your home décor, this is your chance. And, you’ll save hundreds by building it yourself instead of buying it.

First, screw the face frames of the two cabinets together. Drill pilot holes and drive screws through the lower face frame into the upper. Then lay them on one side and hold a straightedge across the fronts of the face frames to be sure they form a straight, flat surface. I had to slip a strip of cardboard between the two cabinet boxes to get the face frames aligned.
Assemble the extension frames using nails or screws and a little glue. Note that one side of the frame (G) is 1/4 in. narrower than the other (H). That creates a recess for the 1/4-in. plywood back (S). Next, skin the cabinet sides with 1/4-in. plywood (Photo 1). After spreading glue, I tacked the plywood in place with a couple of brad nails and then weighted it down with paint cans. Also glue the fillers (E) into the recesses at the top and bottom of the cabinets. Fillers give you a solid core to drive screws through when you screw the cabinets to the base and top—without them, screws might pop right through the flimsy 1/2-in. particleboard of the cabinets.
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