Add some beauty and charm to your dining room table and use up those scrap 2X4 pieces at the same time. This centerpiece is so easy to make and it is absolutely gorgeous when it’s finished. It’s just a little box that you build from your scrap 2X4 pieces. Once you stain it, and maybe distress it a bit, and add your vases, it transforms into a beautiful centerpiece that has a really nice rustic look to it.

Add some beauty and charm to your dining room table and use up those scrap 2X4 pieces at the same time. This centerpiece is so easy to make and it is absolutely gorgeous when it’s finished. It’s just a little box that you build from your scrap 2X4 pieces. Once you stain it, and maybe distress it a bit, and add your vases, it transforms into a beautiful centerpiece that has a really nice rustic look to it.
Can you believe that this amazing wine rack the image below has been built using old wood pallets? Perhaps you can. Isn’t it wonderful that your old wood pallets can be reused to build something so beautiful and useful? I am not a drinker but I liked the idea so much that I just couldn’t resist making myself one. Although later I gifted it to my parents, who totally loved it.
Many of these DIYs are so easy that you can do them in your spare time. Have a weekend free? You can build an outdoor couch, bench, or any number of console and coffee tables to add farmhouse rustic style to your home. In less than an hour, you can make wonderful holiday décor or some beautiful gifts for teachers and friends. I’m telling you, these projects are all super easy and they’re all so very inexpensive. I love simple and cheap projects, and particularly when those projects end in rustic or farmhouse furnishings. Check out these 55 farmhouse furniture projects that you can make yourself.
The best thing about this wine rack is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can modify your wine rack any way you want or build in a design or color different from this one. The basic steps to build a wooden wine rack are the same for all variants. I have included here the video tutorial that I followed in order to build myself a pallet wide rack.
Assemble the extension frames using nails or screws and a little glue. Note that one side of the frame (G) is 1/4 in. narrower than the other (H). That creates a recess for the 1/4-in. plywood back (S). Next, skin the cabinet sides with 1/4-in. plywood (Photo 1). After spreading glue, I tacked the plywood in place with a couple of brad nails and then weighted it down with paint cans. Also glue the fillers (E) into the recesses at the top and bottom of the cabinets. Fillers give you a solid core to drive screws through when you screw the cabinets to the base and top—without them, screws might pop right through the flimsy 1/2-in. particleboard of the cabinets.
This great pencil holder is perfect for your workbench. If you don’t have a workshop and just need something for the craft table or desk, you can totally cut this one down to size. This is the simplest pencil holder ever. You just measure out your 2X4, drill holes and then you’re all done. You could easily make shorter versions of this and paint or stain them to use on your desk.
Making an art or a design on a wooden piece is a hectic task and requires good art skills. But there is another much easier way to carve a beautiful art on any wood surface. For this, you will need the image or graphic that you want to transfer, a piece of wood, freezer paper, etc. I, myself have made several such designs. At the source below, you can find a step by step guide for transferring a graphic image to the wood.
This mirrored coffee table is sure to be a great addition to your living room. It’s also a really easy project to build and the end result is absolutely stunning. You’ll need an old mirror, maybe from a dresser that you don’t need any longer. This one lets you use up some of those 2X4s and repurpose some old furniture at the same time. It should cost you less than $50 to make – as opposed to buying it in a furniture store for a couple hundred.

Assemble the extension frames using nails or screws and a little glue. Note that one side of the frame (G) is 1/4 in. narrower than the other (H). That creates a recess for the 1/4-in. plywood back (S). Next, skin the cabinet sides with 1/4-in. plywood (Photo 1). After spreading glue, I tacked the plywood in place with a couple of brad nails and then weighted it down with paint cans. Also glue the fillers (E) into the recesses at the top and bottom of the cabinets. Fillers give you a solid core to drive screws through when you screw the cabinets to the base and top—without them, screws might pop right through the flimsy 1/2-in. particleboard of the cabinets.

With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.


If you don’t have a porch swing, you are seriously missing out on some great relaxation. The problem with porch swings is that they can be really expensive. I’ve seen just basic swings sell for around $200. The better way is to make your own and this 2X4 porch swing is amazingly simple to build. You’ll just need a few 2X4s and some chains to hang it when you’re finished. Stain it, paint it white, or leave it plain. It looks just like those more expensive swings from home improvement stores but costs about ten times less.
The procedure is very easy to understand and follow for anyone with a little woodworking knowledge. Make sure to collect all the items you need before you start with the project. You may even ask Tracy your queries directly in the comment section of the tutorial post. Or you can ask them here. Either way, I hope that you manage to build this one nicely.
Making an art or a design on a wooden piece is a hectic task and requires good art skills. But there is another much easier way to carve a beautiful art on any wood surface. For this, you will need the image or graphic that you want to transfer, a piece of wood, freezer paper, etc. I, myself have made several such designs. At the source below, you can find a step by step guide for transferring a graphic image to the wood.
You can buy one of these rustic crates for use in any number of DIY projects. They run around $10 or so each. Or, you can make one yourself from your 2X4s and they will cost you about $3 each. You’ll need some serious power tools for this one to cut the boards down to size and to round them off. Once you’re finished, you can use your wooden crate to create so many wonderful things!
First, screw the face frames of the two cabinets together. Drill pilot holes and drive screws through the lower face frame into the upper. Then lay them on one side and hold a straightedge across the fronts of the face frames to be sure they form a straight, flat surface. I had to slip a strip of cardboard between the two cabinet boxes to get the face frames aligned.
You can never have too much storage space and this little bench gives you loads. It’s made from those 2X4s and has a great X leg look. Underneath the seat are crates, which you can also make from your 2X4s, for storing just about anything you need to store. This would be a great outdoor bench for the patio. You can use the crates to store outside toys or even things that you need when you’re grilling out. Best of all, you can build the entire thing, including stain, for around $40 or less.
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The base starts with a plywood frame constructed much like the extension frames: nails or screws, plus glue. Top off the frame by gluing on 1/4-in. plywood (L). Now you’re ready to wrap the frame with solid wood facing using one of my favorite woodworking shortcuts: Instead of routing the facing, then fussing with mitered corners, glue on the facing before you rout and just form simple 90-degree butt joints at corners. Sand the corners flush and then rout the facing (Photo 2). You’ll get tight, perfect corners—fast.
This mirrored coffee table is sure to be a great addition to your living room. It’s also a really easy project to build and the end result is absolutely stunning. You’ll need an old mirror, maybe from a dresser that you don’t need any longer. This one lets you use up some of those 2X4s and repurpose some old furniture at the same time. It should cost you less than $50 to make – as opposed to buying it in a furniture store for a couple hundred.
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