Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.

For your kitchen, it can work as a knife rack. It gives you easy access to all essential tools while saving space. In addition, it adds a nice visual appeal to your kitchen wall. You can customize your wall rack with different materials, designs and styles. I am here sharing the source link to the step by step tutorial about how to make a rustic wall knife rack.
Cut the batting so it overhangs the seat by about 3 in. and the fabric so it overhangs by 4 in. Then stretch and staple the fabric (Photo 1). There are a few ways to deal with seat corners. Photo 2 shows the method I find easiest. Don’t worry about mistakes—the nice thing about upholstery work is that you can always pry out staples and fix mistakes. To fasten the seat to the cabinet, drive screws through the cabinet and fillers and into the seat.
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
This bench can be made from reclaimed wood that you’ve had left over from other projects. It’s a really simple bench to build and is perfect for the mudroom. If you don’t have a mudroom or room near the backdoor to put it, place it on the porch. It’s the perfect place it sit and take off muddy shoes and you can store baskets underneath for holding shoes or scarves and mittens when it’s cold outside.
Here’s another great way to add some whimsical décor to your home and use up those 2X4 blocks at the same time. You can make them into penguins! These little guys are perfect for dressing up your home for the holidays and you can leave them out all winter long. You’ll need blocks of wood and then black and white paint to make the penguin design. This is a great project for the kids to help with – they’ll have a blast creating their own little unique penguin.
If you want something really unique from those 2X4s, build these hexagon wall planters. You cut strips of the 2X4 (you only need a couple of feet for each planter) and then assemble them to hold a mason jar. Inside the mason jar, you can put all sorts of fresh flowers or plants. These are so creative and will look beautiful hanging inside your home.
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