Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.

Any little one is going to love playing with these great DIY building blocks that you can easily make from 2X4s. You’ll need several pieces for the cars and tracks. Once you get them cut into the sizes that you want, you can use stencils to paint in the cars and track designs. These are so great and have such a wonderful rustic look and feel to them.

Used cabinets from remodeling jobs are my first choice for furniture projects (they’re free!). I also like damaged cabinets from the local salvage store (cheap!). The trouble with these tightwad options is that the cabinets are already finished, and finishing raw wood to match the factory finish is tough. To get around this, I’ve painted the furniture or stained the new wood surrounding the cabinets a contrasting color for a two-tone look.

Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.

If you need a sawhorse for all of those woodworking projects, this is an easy one to build. You just nail your 2X4s together to create it and since those boards are a bit heavy, this little sawhorse is rock solid. You won’t have to worry about your boards slipping when you have them on here for sawing. If you don’t have a sawhorse, and you don’t want to spend upwards of $50 to buy a pair, I strongly recommend this DIY project.
First, screw the face frames of the two cabinets together. Drill pilot holes and drive screws through the lower face frame into the upper. Then lay them on one side and hold a straightedge across the fronts of the face frames to be sure they form a straight, flat surface. I had to slip a strip of cardboard between the two cabinet boxes to get the face frames aligned.
Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. How to make storage shelves: All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves.
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