Can you believe that this amazing wine rack the image below has been built using old wood pallets? Perhaps you can. Isn’t it wonderful that your old wood pallets can be reused to build something so beautiful and useful? I am not a drinker but I liked the idea so much that I just couldn’t resist making myself one. Although later I gifted it to my parents, who totally loved it.
This mirrored coffee table is sure to be a great addition to your living room. It’s also a really easy project to build and the end result is absolutely stunning. You’ll need an old mirror, maybe from a dresser that you don’t need any longer. This one lets you use up some of those 2X4s and repurpose some old furniture at the same time. It should cost you less than $50 to make – as opposed to buying it in a furniture store for a couple hundred.
For your kitchen, it can work as a knife rack. It gives you easy access to all essential tools while saving space. In addition, it adds a nice visual appeal to your kitchen wall. You can customize your wall rack with different materials, designs and styles. I am here sharing the source link to the step by step tutorial about how to make a rustic wall knife rack.

You can transfer a graphic on any wood piece of your choice, including a frame, top of a table, etc. The surface should be clean and big enough for the graphic paper. I am also sharing a video tutorial here that explains in detail the process of transferring any graphic to a wooden surface using a freezer paper. Just gather the items you need and follow this video to carve your favorite designs on your favorite wood items.

I’ve always wanted to make my own barstools. I just can never seem to find the ones that I want, which is why I love this 2X4 project idea. You can make your own set of barstools with just a few boards and then paint or stain them however you need to so that they match your home décor. I love this idea for its uniqueness and for how really simple it is to do.
We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.
You can also make one for elders and put it in your garden or terrace or anywhere in the house. Elders can use it to relax and kids can use it to play or sleep. Although this is a really beautiful piece of woodwork, it is not that easy to make. Only someone with good woodworking skill can think of making this swing set. Also, I couldn’t find a good tutorial that illustrates the process of building a wooden boat-shaped swing set. Most Probably, I will write one when I build mine.But if you really want this swing set like right now, I would suggest you hire a good woodworker, who can build something similar. Or just search the internet and maybe you get lucky enough to find a tutorial for this. Good luck either way.

This great pencil holder is perfect for your workbench. If you don’t have a workshop and just need something for the craft table or desk, you can totally cut this one down to size. This is the simplest pencil holder ever. You just measure out your 2X4, drill holes and then you’re all done. You could easily make shorter versions of this and paint or stain them to use on your desk.
In just a few minutes, you can turn those 2X4s into beautifully rustic picture frames. These little frames are perfect for holding your most precious images and they are all so very easy to make. You can use those scrap pieces of board from other projects and create a frame that is perfect for gift giving. Make them as simple or as fancy as you like.
You can transfer a graphic on any wood piece of your choice, including a frame, top of a table, etc. The surface should be clean and big enough for the graphic paper. I am also sharing a video tutorial here that explains in detail the process of transferring any graphic to a wooden surface using a freezer paper. Just gather the items you need and follow this video to carve your favorite designs on your favorite wood items.
You can never have too much storage space and this little bench gives you loads. It’s made from those 2X4s and has a great X leg look. Underneath the seat are crates, which you can also make from your 2X4s, for storing just about anything you need to store. This would be a great outdoor bench for the patio. You can use the crates to store outside toys or even things that you need when you’re grilling out. Best of all, you can build the entire thing, including stain, for around $40 or less.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
This outdoor couch will take a few 2X4s – about 11 of them to be exact but at less than $10 each for the boards, it will still cost you less than anything you can get at a patio or furniture store. And, it’s a really sturdy couch. The best part? You can completely build this couch in less than four hours. Once you’ve finished, just add those homemade couch cushions and you’re all set to relax in the backyard.
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
Assemble the extension frames using nails or screws and a little glue. Note that one side of the frame (G) is 1/4 in. narrower than the other (H). That creates a recess for the 1/4-in. plywood back (S). Next, skin the cabinet sides with 1/4-in. plywood (Photo 1). After spreading glue, I tacked the plywood in place with a couple of brad nails and then weighted it down with paint cans. Also glue the fillers (E) into the recesses at the top and bottom of the cabinets. Fillers give you a solid core to drive screws through when you screw the cabinets to the base and top—without them, screws might pop right through the flimsy 1/2-in. particleboard of the cabinets.
The shelf in the first picture is made of red oak plywood. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. In case if you need more help understanding this project, you can refer the source link below. It discusses various items used, steps and tips and personal experience of the author who personally built a Zigzag shelf.
If you’re looking for a way to instantly change how your bathroom looks, this DIY open shelf vanity that you may from 2X4s is a great start. I love the open shelf look for so many reasons. Those large baskets will perfectly hold your makeup and other toiletries and the shelves are great for keeping extra towels and other necessities right there at your fingertips. It’s also the perfect vanity if you like those bowl type sinks. Plus, this is an easy build – you can have it completed in just a few hours.
Assemble the extension frames using nails or screws and a little glue. Note that one side of the frame (G) is 1/4 in. narrower than the other (H). That creates a recess for the 1/4-in. plywood back (S). Next, skin the cabinet sides with 1/4-in. plywood (Photo 1). After spreading glue, I tacked the plywood in place with a couple of brad nails and then weighted it down with paint cans. Also glue the fillers (E) into the recesses at the top and bottom of the cabinets. Fillers give you a solid core to drive screws through when you screw the cabinets to the base and top—without them, screws might pop right through the flimsy 1/2-in. particleboard of the cabinets.
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