Cut the batting so it overhangs the seat by about 3 in. and the fabric so it overhangs by 4 in. Then stretch and staple the fabric (Photo 1). There are a few ways to deal with seat corners. Photo 2 shows the method I find easiest. Don’t worry about mistakes—the nice thing about upholstery work is that you can always pry out staples and fix mistakes. To fasten the seat to the cabinet, drive screws through the cabinet and fillers and into the seat.
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!
When neither paint nor a two-tone look is suitable, I buy unfinished stock cabinets like the ones shown in this article. Home centers usually carry one style only and one wood species only (typically oak). For the projects shown here, I used 12-in.-deep “upper” cabinets. The cabinets you find may not be exactly like mine, so you may have to alter the measurements given in my plans.

These block bunnies that you build from 2X4s are perfect for Easter. They’re easy to make and such a whimsical way to dress up your spring décor. Just cut blocks from those 2X4s of different sizes, you can make an entire family of bunnies, and then paint them white with a little distressing and add your bunny ears and faces. They’re so easy to make and add such wonderful whimsy to your home.


Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc—inside the traced circle—then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
This great floating shelf has a nice rustic quality to it. This little shelf is really easy to build and will only take you a couple of hours at the most. You can use it for a mantel if you don’t have one – imagine hanging your stockings from it! Once it’s finished, just stain however you want and maybe sand it down a bit to give it a great worn look.

With technology changing so fast, it didn’t seem smart to sink a lot of money into a TV stand. But inexpensive stands didn’t have the features I wanted: enclosed storage and lots of shelves for electronic components. This stand gives me those things, plus it’s rock solid. Some inexpensive stands are rated to support 75 lbs. or less. This thing would hold a V-8 engine block. It’s sized for a 42-in. TV, but you could easily make it bigger by spacing the cabinets farther apart or choosing wider cabinets. It’s taller than most stands, which may be good or bad, depending on your situation.
What is the one thing every woodworker needs? Yes, a workbench. Now that you have or at least I am assuming you have worked on so many woodworking projects, you are close to becoming a professional woodworker. You now probably owe yourself a nice woodworking bench. You should also know that a true woodworker never buys his bench from the market, but always builds one himself. But before you start this project, you should know what a workbench is.
This coffee table is so unique and it’s really easy to build. You’ll need a few 2X4s which you basically stack, toggled to create a beautiful design, on top of a metal leg base. I love the look of this one. It combines that great rustic look with a wonderful 1960’s look that is perfect for any living room. You could use the bench style legs or wooden legs – or even build the legs yourself from the leftover pieces of your boards.
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