Take those old 2X4s and put them to great use building this easy DIY bike rack. If you have kids, and those kids have bikes, you know how those bikes can be left out or topple over, getting in the way of everything. You can build this great basic bike rack in the garage, on the porch, or wherever you normally store your bikes. It keeps everyone’s bike separate and keeps them from falling over when they’re not in use. Plus, it’s a really easy build.
Here’s another wonderful DIY centerpiece idea that you can create with those leftover 2X4 pieces. This one has small holes all around the base that you can put bud vases in. Just fill those little vases with whatever flowers you want to display. You just put all the pieces together, drill the holes and then stain or paint. You can use test tubes for your vases and then just add your favorite blooms.
The base starts with a plywood frame constructed much like the extension frames: nails or screws, plus glue. Top off the frame by gluing on 1/4-in. plywood (L). Now you’re ready to wrap the frame with solid wood facing using one of my favorite woodworking shortcuts: Instead of routing the facing, then fussing with mitered corners, glue on the facing before you rout and just form simple 90-degree butt joints at corners. Sand the corners flush and then rout the facing (Photo 2). You’ll get tight, perfect corners—fast.
Screw the cabinets first to the base, driving screws from inside the cabinet boxes (see Figure A). Then set the top in place and fasten it the same way before adding the back panel (S). Measure between the cabinets and subtract 1/8 in. to determine the width of the shelves. To make the shelves, glue banding to a long piece of plywood and rout it with a round-over bit, just as you did to make the top. Then cut the plywood into sections. The shelves rest on adjustable supports. I drilled 2-in. holes into the extension frames for cables to exit behind the stand. Those holes also provide a nook to stuff excess wires into. Next, disassemble the stand for finishing. I applied two heavy coats of Minwax Ebony stain followed by two coats of Minwax Wipe-On Poly. Later, with the stand assembled and in place, I drove a single screw through the top cleat (T) into a wall stud—insurance against tipping forward.

This mirrored coffee table is sure to be a great addition to your living room. It’s also a really easy project to build and the end result is absolutely stunning. You’ll need an old mirror, maybe from a dresser that you don’t need any longer. This one lets you use up some of those 2X4s and repurpose some old furniture at the same time. It should cost you less than $50 to make – as opposed to buying it in a furniture store for a couple hundred.
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