Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
This great floating shelf has a nice rustic quality to it. This little shelf is really easy to build and will only take you a couple of hours at the most. You can use it for a mantel if you don’t have one – imagine hanging your stockings from it! Once it’s finished, just stain however you want and maybe sand it down a bit to give it a great worn look.
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As a world-class penny pincher, I’ve found that stock cabinets are the key to low-cost, good-quality DIY furniture. I get handsome, sturdy, real-wood furniture for the cost of assemble-it-yourself pieces sold at discount stores. And the advantages go way beyond saving money. Cabinets make furniture building incredibly quick and easy by eliminating the difficult, fussy process of building and hanging doors.
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.

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Assemble the extension frames using nails or screws and a little glue. Note that one side of the frame (G) is 1/4 in. narrower than the other (H). That creates a recess for the 1/4-in. plywood back (S). Next, skin the cabinet sides with 1/4-in. plywood (Photo 1). After spreading glue, I tacked the plywood in place with a couple of brad nails and then weighted it down with paint cans. Also glue the fillers (E) into the recesses at the top and bottom of the cabinets. Fillers give you a solid core to drive screws through when you screw the cabinets to the base and top—without them, screws might pop right through the flimsy 1/2-in. particleboard of the cabinets.

If you tend to do a lot of DIY projects, particularly with wood and the like, you’re probably going to want a great shelf to store all of those cans of paint. You don’t necessarily need something fancy, just big enough, right? Those 2X4s can be used to create a huge shelf that will leave you plenty of room for storing paint cans – or anything else that you need to store.
If you need a sawhorse for all of those woodworking projects, this is an easy one to build. You just nail your 2X4s together to create it and since those boards are a bit heavy, this little sawhorse is rock solid. You won’t have to worry about your boards slipping when you have them on here for sawing. If you don’t have a sawhorse, and you don’t want to spend upwards of $50 to buy a pair, I strongly recommend this DIY project.
Here’s another wonderful DIY centerpiece idea that you can create with those leftover 2X4 pieces. This one has small holes all around the base that you can put bud vases in. Just fill those little vases with whatever flowers you want to display. You just put all the pieces together, drill the holes and then stain or paint. You can use test tubes for your vases and then just add your favorite blooms.
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.

I got this idea from a Pinterest post. The final product looks so beautiful that I just couldn’t wait to make one for myself. This was somewhat a different experience from my other regular DIY projects as it doesn’t involve making something from scratch, but turning an existing wood piece into another one. Nonetheless, I enjoyed it very much and the final product was very satisfying. The tutorial I used is linked below.
This coffee table is so unique and it’s really easy to build. You’ll need a few 2X4s which you basically stack, toggled to create a beautiful design, on top of a metal leg base. I love the look of this one. It combines that great rustic look with a wonderful 1960’s look that is perfect for any living room. You could use the bench style legs or wooden legs – or even build the legs yourself from the leftover pieces of your boards.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
We’ve already done rope, and now we’re on to another rustic material we love: wood! It’s as basic of a material as clay and is constantly reinvented by DIYers, crafters, artists, hackers, and carpenters. To get inspired to create our own batch of cool wooden objects, we turned to our favorite fellow makers to see what projects they’ve come up with. Scroll down for our top DIY wood project picks.
Christmas decorations can be so expensive, especially when you want something as unique as these little snowmen. You can build these yourself so easily. You’ll need blocks from those 2X4s – about three blocks for each snowman – and some paint and other decorations. Just sand the blocks down and paint them white and then add scrapbooking paper with Mod Podge for the design. Then just add your faces and you’re all done.
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
Put those 2X4s to great use by building this amazing farmhouse styled X console. If you need a console table, this is a great one to build. It’s pretty easy and you get that wonderful rustic country look. You can use reclaimed wood to give it a more distressed look or build it from new boards and just distress it yourself – or paint it white, whatever you want to match your existing decor.

Before fall comes around, you just have to make this great pumpkin décor from those leftover 2X4 scraps. These look like decorations that you can get at Hobby Lobby and other similar stores, which typically run around $50 for the set. You can make them yourself for under $5 if you have the boards on hand. Just paint them orange and add your decorations. This is such a simple project and it gives you such lovely décor for fall.
Any little one is going to love playing with these great DIY building blocks that you can easily make from 2X4s. You’ll need several pieces for the cars and tracks. Once you get them cut into the sizes that you want, you can use stencils to paint in the cars and track designs. These are so great and have such a wonderful rustic look and feel to them.
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc—inside the traced circle—then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
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