This mirrored coffee table is sure to be a great addition to your living room. It’s also a really easy project to build and the end result is absolutely stunning. You’ll need an old mirror, maybe from a dresser that you don’t need any longer. This one lets you use up some of those 2X4s and repurpose some old furniture at the same time. It should cost you less than $50 to make – as opposed to buying it in a furniture store for a couple hundred.
Assemble the extension frames using nails or screws and a little glue. Note that one side of the frame (G) is 1/4 in. narrower than the other (H). That creates a recess for the 1/4-in. plywood back (S). Next, skin the cabinet sides with 1/4-in. plywood (Photo 1). After spreading glue, I tacked the plywood in place with a couple of brad nails and then weighted it down with paint cans. Also glue the fillers (E) into the recesses at the top and bottom of the cabinets. Fillers give you a solid core to drive screws through when you screw the cabinets to the base and top—without them, screws might pop right through the flimsy 1/2-in. particleboard of the cabinets.
I’ve always wanted to make my own barstools. I just can never seem to find the ones that I want, which is why I love this 2X4 project idea. You can make your own set of barstools with just a few boards and then paint or stain them however you need to so that they match your home décor. I love this idea for its uniqueness and for how really simple it is to do.

Did you know that you can build your own kitchen island for around $30? This wooden island made from 2X4s is not only beautiful, it’s also functional and so much cheaper than anything you can buy in a store. I love the rustic look of this, especially with the wood on white but you can do it in any color or design that you want. The point is, it’s really cheap and it’s the perfect island for any kitchen.
When neither paint nor a two-tone look is suitable, I buy unfinished stock cabinets like the ones shown in this article. Home centers usually carry one style only and one wood species only (typically oak). For the projects shown here, I used 12-in.-deep “upper” cabinets. The cabinets you find may not be exactly like mine, so you may have to alter the measurements given in my plans.
Take those old 2X4s and put them to great use building this easy DIY bike rack. If you have kids, and those kids have bikes, you know how those bikes can be left out or topple over, getting in the way of everything. You can build this great basic bike rack in the garage, on the porch, or wherever you normally store your bikes. It keeps everyone’s bike separate and keeps them from falling over when they’re not in use. Plus, it’s a really easy build.
Isn’t this amazing that instead of having to throw that old furniture piece away, you can now reuse it to build something even more beautiful? If you do not like this particular idea, there are many other re-purposeful furniture items you can build from an old dresser. Just search the internet for other DIY project ideas. Here is a link to the video tutorial that explains the same procedure in a more practical manner that you can easily follow through.
Turn those 2X4s into amazing gifts for your kids’ teachers. Just cut them into blocks, maybe add some design with scrapbooking paper and then a nice little quote fit for a teacher. These are so cute and since the boards cost less than $10 each – and you get about four blocks from each board – you’re getting a unique gift for teacher for less than $3 each!

To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
With technology changing so fast, it didn’t seem smart to sink a lot of money into a TV stand. But inexpensive stands didn’t have the features I wanted: enclosed storage and lots of shelves for electronic components. This stand gives me those things, plus it’s rock solid. Some inexpensive stands are rated to support 75 lbs. or less. This thing would hold a V-8 engine block. It’s sized for a 42-in. TV, but you could easily make it bigger by spacing the cabinets farther apart or choosing wider cabinets. It’s taller than most stands, which may be good or bad, depending on your situation.
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