If you’re looking for a way to instantly change how your bathroom looks, this DIY open shelf vanity that you may from 2X4s is a great start. I love the open shelf look for so many reasons. Those large baskets will perfectly hold your makeup and other toiletries and the shelves are great for keeping extra towels and other necessities right there at your fingertips. It’s also the perfect vanity if you like those bowl type sinks. Plus, this is an easy build – you can have it completed in just a few hours.
Screw the cabinets first to the base, driving screws from inside the cabinet boxes (see Figure A). Then set the top in place and fasten it the same way before adding the back panel (S). Measure between the cabinets and subtract 1/8 in. to determine the width of the shelves. To make the shelves, glue banding to a long piece of plywood and rout it with a round-over bit, just as you did to make the top. Then cut the plywood into sections. The shelves rest on adjustable supports. I drilled 2-in. holes into the extension frames for cables to exit behind the stand. Those holes also provide a nook to stuff excess wires into. Next, disassemble the stand for finishing. I applied two heavy coats of Minwax Ebony stain followed by two coats of Minwax Wipe-On Poly. Later, with the stand assembled and in place, I drove a single screw through the top cleat (T) into a wall stud—insurance against tipping forward.
With technology changing so fast, it didn’t seem smart to sink a lot of money into a TV stand. But inexpensive stands didn’t have the features I wanted: enclosed storage and lots of shelves for electronic components. This stand gives me those things, plus it’s rock solid. Some inexpensive stands are rated to support 75 lbs. or less. This thing would hold a V-8 engine block. It’s sized for a 42-in. TV, but you could easily make it bigger by spacing the cabinets farther apart or choosing wider cabinets. It’s taller than most stands, which may be good or bad, depending on your situation.
With technology changing so fast, it didn’t seem smart to sink a lot of money into a TV stand. But inexpensive stands didn’t have the features I wanted: enclosed storage and lots of shelves for electronic components. This stand gives me those things, plus it’s rock solid. Some inexpensive stands are rated to support 75 lbs. or less. This thing would hold a V-8 engine block. It’s sized for a 42-in. TV, but you could easily make it bigger by spacing the cabinets farther apart or choosing wider cabinets. It’s taller than most stands, which may be good or bad, depending on your situation.

This charging station looks just like those expensive ones you see at department stores, but it will cost you much less. Actually, if you have a 2X4 on hand, it won’t cost you anything. You just need to cut a piece of your board, measure the hole that you need to fit your phone and then stain the board. You can build it to fit your phone no matter what type it is, so there are no worries of the phone not being secure while it’s charging.

Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
With technology changing so fast, it didn’t seem smart to sink a lot of money into a TV stand. But inexpensive stands didn’t have the features I wanted: enclosed storage and lots of shelves for electronic components. This stand gives me those things, plus it’s rock solid. Some inexpensive stands are rated to support 75 lbs. or less. This thing would hold a V-8 engine block. It’s sized for a 42-in. TV, but you could easily make it bigger by spacing the cabinets farther apart or choosing wider cabinets. It’s taller than most stands, which may be good or bad, depending on your situation. 
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